Election Day - November 8, 2016

Have you ever heard someone say, “Why vote?  It’s not going to make a difference” or “I don’t have time, one vote won’t matter anyway.”  I’ve heard so many people say things similar to these statements over the years, and during one brief moment in my life I almost started to believe it myself. 

Have you ever heard someone say, “Why vote?  It’s not going to make a difference” or “I don’t have time, one vote won’t matter anyway.”  I’ve heard so many people say things similar to these statements over the years, and during one brief moment in my life I almost started to believe it myself. 

With election day one week away, my curiosity starts churning as I peruse over my absentee ballot I’ve been working on for about a week.  How many people actually vote in America?  How many people are registered to vote?  How many are eligible but aren’t registered?  Etc.  So, being the researcher I am I head for Google, where you can’t believe everything you find but can get a pretty good idea of what’s going on concerning any particular subject you’re interested in.  What I found was this approximation:

 

In the 2012 election there were 219 million eligible voters, of which only 67% were actually registered and only 58% of registered voters voted.  That means there were 92 million people who didn’t vote who could have.   NINETY-TWO MILLION PEOPLE DIDN’T VOTE!  That’s astonishing to me.  Have they all succumbed to the lie that their vote doesn’t matter? 

 

For those of you who’ve never voted and may not know, it’s more than voting for the next president of the United States.  You’re voting for congressmen, local government leaders, decisions about schools, business, taxes, and all kinds of other local subjects that directly affect you right now.  If you are an absentee voter you should already have your ballot as it should have been mailed to you.  If you aren’t it could be overwhelming to walk into a polling station thinking you’re going to vote for a president and the ballot is 4 pages long.  It’s a lot to take in but you can go online and see what is on your ballot before you get to the poll so you will already know what your decisions are before you get there, it takes less time that way.  Here are some links for Glenn and Butte counties for more information.  I’ve also included Tehama county but couldn’t find updated information on the upcoming election so I’ve included a link where you type in your address and you should be able to view what will be on your ballot.

Glenn County

Butte County

 

Tehama County

Sample Ballot Lookup

 

I don’t care for politics, history and government were my worst subjects in school, and I despise all the drama associated with it all.  That being said, somewhere along the line I learned that voting was important, voting mattered, and voting was a right and a privilege.  So, I’m carefully considering every mark on this ballot, even more so than in elections past, because it’s important.

Your vote matters, don’t let anyone tell you it doesn’t.

 

 

Posted on November 1, 2016 .

When the Cool Comes

When fall is upon us and temperatures drop it’s not uncommon for Absolute Heating & Air to get calls about a burning smell coming from their heater when turning it on for the first time in the season.  There a a couple reasons this may happen.

 

Dust in your system.

This is the most common, especially since so  many of our customers live on or around farms and harvest makes everything dusty.  Even if you don’t live in a particularly dusty area, after sitting idle during our long stretches of warm weather here in the valley your heating system may have accumulated a layer of dust.  When you turn your heat on for the first time, that dust will burn off and emit an odor which circulates through your duct system into your home.  This smell will dissipate as the dust is burned off and is usually no reason for concern.  If it lasts for more that a few days though, you may want to have us come out and check it out.

 

Activating heat strips.

If you have a heat pump you more than likely have some sort of electrical backup in your system.  A heat pump is designed to not use this electrical option unless temperatures are unusually low and will only kick in when needed.  So, if you’ve been using your heater for a while and the temperature drops, your heat strips probably started and the dust is burning off of them, which again should only last a day or so.  

 

Other causes.

Should you continue to notice a burning smell beyond the initial use of your heater this season, you may have faulty heating components, debris or other objects in or around your heating system, or possibly an electrical short.  In this case it would be wise to have an expert come and take a look.

 

What you can do.

Regularly scheduled maintenances are a great way to head off potential problems.  During a heating maintenance we not only check all of your heating components we also turn the heat on and make sure it’s working well.  During this time, if it is the first time the heat has been turned on for the season, the technician should be able to determine that the smell is dust or maybe something else.  

 

If you are concerned about odors in your HVAC system, we’ll by happy to come out and take a look at it for you!

Posted on October 21, 2016 .